Dr Mark S Jackson

B.A.(Hons), M.A., Ph.D.(Alta.)

  • BS8 1SS

19962020

Research output per year

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Personal profile

Research interests

Welcome to my research profile.

I am a human geographer with a research focus in the following areas:

  • coloniality, decolonial, and postcolonial geographies
  • contemporary and classical social theory and philosophy
  • urbanism and built space
  • technology and materiality
  • political ecology
  • critical political economy

 

Current Research

The aim of my current research is to rethink the political and ethical meaning of critique within relational ecologies and under the terms of decoloniality. More broadly, my research focuses on how the postcolonial imagination and decolonising intellectual and practical projects are influenced by, and influence, posthumanisms.

In 2018, I published an edited volume on the relationships between coloniality, political ontology, and posthumanisms. Coloniality, Ontology, and the Question of the Posthuman (Routledge, 2018) includes an introduction and first chapter by me, and a lovely series of reflections by a diverse range of scholars in disciplines like: human geography, politics, and literary studies. I am also currently the series editor for a new Routledge Research Series called 'New Postcolonialisms'.

 

Past Research

Past research has examined the materialities of artificial islands, consumption and built space, postcolonial city spaces, commodities and urban consumer landscapes, city ruins, and historiographic ethics. Published work also includes visual research and photographic exhibitions.

 

Background

In the summer of 2007, I joined the University of Bristol’s School of Geographical Sciences after having completed my PhD at the University of Alberta, in Canada, under the supervision of the noted Marxian sociologist and cultural historian, Prof. Derek Sayer. My PhD research focused on the postcolonial modernity of Calcutta. After a long stint of ethnographic, textual, archival, and visual research in Calcutta, I mobilised a reading of the city-text through the lens of German philosopher and literary critic Walter Benjamin, Bengali literary modernism, folk painting, and transitioning architectures of consumption and dwelling in the city.

My background is primarily theoretical, as my undergraduate honours and masters degrees were in philosophy, with an emphasis, in the latter, on Foucault’s aesthetics and the ethics of critique. Qualitative interests in visual methods, ethnography, and historiography were fuelled in the PhD, and continue to make themselves felt today. Comprehensive specialisms also included work in science and technology studies, political ecology, and environmental ethics. I taught for a few years at the University of Alberta as a Sessional Instructor while completing my PhD. Courses I taught included urban studies, community studies, gender theory, social and critical theory, introductory political economy, and introductory sociology.

 

Research Supervision

I currently supervise 7 Phd students in a range of disciplinary areas including political geographies of peace, pre-figurative politics and praxes of urban change, urban futurity, and political ecology. Their geographical range is global with analyses in places like Northern Ireland, Cape Town, Chile, the UK, the EU, and China. Similarly, the theoretical range and methodologies employed in their projects is also diverse, with research emerging from attention to new materialisms, affect, feminist embodiment, Institutional Ethnography (IE), semiotics, post- and de-coloniality, post-politics, and critical geo-politics.

Due to a full complement of PhD supervision, I am not accepting new PhD students.    

 

Memberships

Association of American Geographers (AAG)

Royal Geographical Society Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG)

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Structured keywords and research groupings

  • PolicyBristolGlobalPoliticalEconomy
  • PolicyBristolSocialChangeAndDiversity
  • Global Political Economy
  • Health Science and Technology
  • Urban Research Cluster
  • International Development
  • Cabot Institute City Futures Research
  • Cabot Institute Environmental Change Research

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Projects

Research Output

Critique’s coloniality and pluriversal recognition: on care as the ecological ground of justice

Jackson, M. S., 31 Jan 2020, (Accepted/In press) Unsettling Colonialism in the Canadian Criminal Justice System: A Reader. Chartrand, V. & Savarese, J. (eds.). Edmonton, Canada: Athabasca University Press

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

On Decolonising the Anthropocene: disobedience via plural constitutions

Jackson, M., 28 May 2020, (Accepted/In press) In : Annals of the American Association of Geographers.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

  • Agonism, critical political geography, and the new geographies of peace

    Bregazzi, H. & Jackson, M., 1 Feb 2018, In : Progress in Human Geography. 42, 1, p. 72-91 20 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

    Open Access
    File
  • 12 Citations (Scopus)
    380 Downloads (Pure)

    Supervised Work

    Breathing Shared Worlds: Northern Ireland, Territory, and Peace

    Author: Merrick, C. A., 23 Jan 2020

    Supervisor: Jackson, M. S. (Supervisor) & Fannin, M. (Supervisor)

    Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    File

    Religious Pluralism and Imagination: Towards a Postsecular City

    Author: Carta, G., 25 Sep 2018

    Supervisor: Jackson, M. (Supervisor)

    Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    File
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