Interrelationships between housing transitions and fertility in Britain and Australia

  • Steele, Fiona A (Principal Investigator)
  • Clarke, Paul S (Co-Investigator)
  • Ermisch, John (Co-Investigator)
  • Kulu, Hill (Co-Investigator)
  • Washbrook, E V (Co-Investigator)
  • Haynes, Michele (Co-Investigator)
  • Martinez, Arturo (Co-Investigator)
  • Spallek, Melanie (Co-Investigator)

Project Details

Description

Housing transitions - such as changes in housing tenure, residential mobility - are the outcomes of a complex history of other life course events such as union formation and dissolution, births of children, and changes in employment. The principal aim of this project was to examine the extent to which housing transitions and residential location choice are influenced by fertility outcomes such as the birth of a(nother) child or a child reaching primary or secondary school age, allowing for the effects of other social processes such as union formation and dissolution and employment changes. Another aim of the project was to explore spatial variation in fertility by residential context, distinguishing rural areas and different size urban areas, and the effects of area characteristics on mobility and location choice. In addition, we examined housing market effects on residential mobility and fertility.

Layman's description

The project examines the extent to which housing transitions and choice of residential location are influenced by fertility outcomes such as the birth of a child or children and the age of children, for instance whether a child reaching primary or secondary school age influences a decision to move house.

The research takes into account the effects of other social factors on these decisions, such as marriage or divorce and employment changes. The project examines the characteristics and size of rural and urban areas, and the effects these have on mobility and choice of location. It also considers the effects of the housing market on residential mobility and fertility.

Key findings

The project also investigated a number of important methodological issues in the analysis of household panel data. Methodological research considered different approaches to the analysis of household-level decisions using longitudinal individual-level data when household composition changes over time, adjustment for unmeasured individual characteristics that affect both changes in housing and changes in fertility, non-ignorable attrition when drop-out is directly influenced by moving home, and estimation of push and pull effects of area characteristics in residential location choice.

The primary data source for the project was the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). Research by the Australian team used the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/10/101/04/14

Structured keywords

  • SoE Centre for Multilevel Modelling

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  • Research Output

    • 6 Article (Academic Journal)

    A Longitudinal Mixed Logit Model for Estimation of Push and Pull Effects in Residential Location Choice

    Steele, F. A., Washbrook, E., Charlton, C. & Browne, W. J., 2016, In : Journal of the American Statistical Association. 111, 515, p. 1061-1074 14 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

    Open Access
    File
  • 1 Citation (Scopus)
    290 Downloads (Pure)

    Investigating non-ignorable dropout in panel studies of residential mobility

    Washbrook, E., Clarke, P. S. & Steele, F., Feb 2014, In : Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series C. 63, 2, p. 239-266 28 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

  • 13 Citations (Scopus)

    Residential context, migration and fertility in a modern urban society

    Kulu, H. & Washbrook, E., Sep 2014, In : Advances in Life Course Research. 21, p. 168-82 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)