'A bit of common ground': personalisation and the use of shared knowledge in interactions between people with learning disabilities and their personal assistants

Val Williams*, Lisa Ponting, Kerrie Ford, Philippa Rudge

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Personalisation is the new mantra in social care; this article focuses on how personalisation can be achieved in practice, by presenting an analysis of data from people with learning disabilities and their personal assistants (PAs), where traditional care relationships have often been shown to be disempowering (Antaki et al., 2007b). The focus here is on the ways in which both parties use references to shared knowledge, joint experiences or personal-life information. These strategies can be used for various social goals, and instances are given where shared references are used during non task-related talk. Both parties are seen on occasion to attempt to refer to shared information, and dense layers of inference can result, which move the interaction onto an ordinary, more symmetrical and friendly footing. The article concludes that shared knowledge referencing creates a way to shift between the personal and the professional, to blur the boundaries, and to create a new and more personalised relationship.

    Translated title of the contribution'A bit of common ground': personalisation and the use of shared knowledge in interactions between people with learning disabilities and their personal assistants
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)607-624
    Number of pages18
    JournalDiscourse Studies
    Volume11
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher: Sage

    Keywords

    • autonomy
    • choice
    • control
    • friendly
    • institutional asymmetry
    • learning disability
    • personalisation
    • CONVERSATION ANALYSIS

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