A Cautionary Tale: Colonial and post-colonial conceptions of good government and democratisation in Africa

VM Hewitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The term good government has figured prominently in recent development theories that have sought to link capitalism with democracy. One striking feature of this trend has been a failure to locate the term within a broader comparative literature on British colonial reform from the mid-1930s onwards. The trajectory of the term good government since the early 1990s is one that would have been familiar to the colonial reformers like Lord Hailey: from an emphasis on technical and capitalist efficiency, the term has come to signal a concern with political empowerment and, ultimately, democratisation. The article suggests that the parallel trajectories of this key concept during these two periods raises important questions about the nature of both empire and the current global order within which development theories are put into practice.
Translated title of the contributionA Cautionary Tale: Colonial and post-colonial conceptions of good government and democratisation in Africa
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41 - 61
Number of pages21
JournalCommonwealth and Comparative Politics
Volume44 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Routledge

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