A comparison between measured and modeled residual stresses in a circumferentially Butt-welded P91 steel pipe

A. H. Yaghi, T. H. Hyde, A. A. Becker, W. Sun, G. Hilson, S. Simandjuntak, P. E J Flewitt, M. J. Pavier, D. J. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Residual macrostresses in a multipass circumferentially butt-welded P91 ferritic steel pipe have been determined numerically and experimentally. The welded joint in a pipe with an outer diameter of 290 mm and a wall thickness of 55 mm is typical of power generation plant components. An axisymmetric thermomechanical finite element model has been used to predict the resulting residual hoop and axial stresses in the welded pipe. The effects of the austenite to martensite phase transformation have been incorporated into the simulation. Residual stresses have been measured using the X-ray diffraction technique along the outer surface of the pipe and using the deep-hole drilling technique through the wall thickness at the center of the weld. Good correlation has been demonstrated between the residual hoop and the axial stresses obtained numerically and experimentally. The paper demonstrates the importance of using a mixed experimental and numerical approach to determine accurately the residual macrostress distribution in welded components. Copyright © 2009 by ASME.

Original languageEnglish
Article number011206
Number of pages10
JournalJOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME
Volume132
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 2010

Bibliographical note

Publisher: ASME-AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENG, THREE PARK AVE, NEW YORK, NY 10016-5990 USA

Keywords

  • Deephole drilling
  • Finite element simulation
  • Martensite transformation
  • P91 steel pipe
  • Residual stress
  • Welding
  • X-ray diffraction

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