A discovery of possible Upper Palaeolithic parietal art in Cathole cave, Gower Peninsula, South Wales.

GH Nash, P van Calsteren, L Thomas, Michael J Simms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

In September 2010 an engraving was discovered in Cathole Cave on the Gower peninsula in South Wales which has been interpreted as a possible representation of a cervid. Uranium series dating of calcite which overlays part of the engraving has been dated to approx 12,500 BP thus confirming a probable Upper Palaeolithic date for the figure.
Translated title of the contributionThe Power and the Violence of the Archers: All is not well down in Ambridge (A study of representational warriors from the Mesolithic Spanish Levant)
Original languageEnglish
Article number25:3
Pages (from-to)81 - 98
Number of pages327
JournalProceedings of the University of Bristol Spelaeological Society
Volume25
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Bibliographical note

Paper recording the oldest prehistoric engravings in the British Isles

Keywords

  • rock art
  • cervid
  • Upper Palaeolithic
  • Gower Coast

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