A framework for optimising product performance through using field experience of in-service products to improve the design and manufacture stages of the product lifecycle

Joel E Igba, Kazem Alemzadeh, Paul M Gibbons, John Friis

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Paperpeer-review

Abstract

For many component sub-systems which make up the individual elements of a larger product system, the optimisation of their performance in the system becomes more difficult through design modifications and/or manufacturing process improvements alone. The authors’ argue this can be improved if adequate field performance data has been fed back to the early stages of the product lifecycle. This paper presents a framework for an inclusive lifecycle approach to optimising product performance through the effective use of field experience and knowledge to improve the design and manufacturing of sub-systems. The problem is presented alongside a taxonomic and captious review of literature of relevant subject areas, followed by a case study using wind turbine sub-system components as a basis to support the investigation. A framework is then developed through the combination of systems thinking and continuous improvement tools, applied to the conventional product lifecycle. The findings of the investigation indicate that sub-system performance can be improved through the accumulation of knowledge fed back to the design and manufacture stages of the product lifecycle using information from in-service product performance. The approach would be useful to practitioners and academics with an interest in applying an inclusive and holistic approach to product lifecycle management. This framework is particularly useful for companies that produce and/or operate systems whose sub-systems are manufactured by different suppliers.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2013

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