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A friend in need is a friend indeed: Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers

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A friend in need is a friend indeed : Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers. / Smith, Daniel; Dyble, Mark; Major, Katie; Page, Abigail E.; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Thompson, James; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Mace, Ruth.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 82-89.

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Smith, D, Dyble, M, Major, K, Page, AE, Chaudhary, N, Salali, GD, Thompson, J, Vinicius, L, Migliano, AB & Mace, R 2019, 'A friend in need is a friend indeed: Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers', Evolution and Human Behavior, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 82-89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.08.004

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Smith, Daniel ; Dyble, Mark ; Major, Katie ; Page, Abigail E. ; Chaudhary, Nikhil ; Salali, Gul Deniz ; Thompson, James ; Vinicius, Lucio ; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg ; Mace, Ruth. / A friend in need is a friend indeed : Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers. In: Evolution and Human Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 82-89.

Bibtex

@article{f31a49d14f6740cba19742ee03b0326d,
title = "A friend in need is a friend indeed: Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers",
abstract = "Despite much theorizing, the evolutionary reasons why humans cooperate extensively with unrelated individuals are still largely unknown. While reciprocity explains many instances of non-kin cooperation, much remains to be understood. A recent suite of models based upon ‘cooperative assortativity’ suggest that non-kin cooperation can evolve if individuals preferentially assort with certain cooperative phenotypes, such as helping those who help others. Here, we test these assortative hypotheses among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using an experimental resource allocation game in which individuals divide resources between themselves and camp-mates. Individuals preferentially shared with less cooperative individuals, arguing against cooperative assortativity as a mechanism sustaining resource transfers in this population. Rather, sharing was often based on the recipient's level of need, in addition to kin-based transfers and reciprocal sharing. Contrary to several recent theoretical accounts, in this real-world setting we find no evidence for cooperative assortativity influencing patterns of cooperation. These results may reflect the demands of living in a foraging ecology characterized by high resource stochasticity, necessitating need-based sharing as a system of long-term reciprocity to mitigate repeated subsistence shortfalls.",
keywords = "Cooperation, Assortativity, Need-based sharing, Reciprocity, Hunter-gatherers, Experimental games",
author = "Daniel Smith and Mark Dyble and Katie Major and Page, {Abigail E.} and Nikhil Chaudhary and Salali, {Gul Deniz} and James Thompson and Lucio Vinicius and Migliano, {Andrea Bamberg} and Ruth Mace",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.08.004",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "82--89",
journal = "Evolution and Human Behavior",
issn = "1090-5138",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - A friend in need is a friend indeed

T2 - Need-based sharing, rather than cooperative assortment, predicts experimental resource transfers among Agta hunter-gatherers

AU - Smith, Daniel

AU - Dyble, Mark

AU - Major, Katie

AU - Page, Abigail E.

AU - Chaudhary, Nikhil

AU - Salali, Gul Deniz

AU - Thompson, James

AU - Vinicius, Lucio

AU - Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

AU - Mace, Ruth

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Despite much theorizing, the evolutionary reasons why humans cooperate extensively with unrelated individuals are still largely unknown. While reciprocity explains many instances of non-kin cooperation, much remains to be understood. A recent suite of models based upon ‘cooperative assortativity’ suggest that non-kin cooperation can evolve if individuals preferentially assort with certain cooperative phenotypes, such as helping those who help others. Here, we test these assortative hypotheses among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using an experimental resource allocation game in which individuals divide resources between themselves and camp-mates. Individuals preferentially shared with less cooperative individuals, arguing against cooperative assortativity as a mechanism sustaining resource transfers in this population. Rather, sharing was often based on the recipient's level of need, in addition to kin-based transfers and reciprocal sharing. Contrary to several recent theoretical accounts, in this real-world setting we find no evidence for cooperative assortativity influencing patterns of cooperation. These results may reflect the demands of living in a foraging ecology characterized by high resource stochasticity, necessitating need-based sharing as a system of long-term reciprocity to mitigate repeated subsistence shortfalls.

AB - Despite much theorizing, the evolutionary reasons why humans cooperate extensively with unrelated individuals are still largely unknown. While reciprocity explains many instances of non-kin cooperation, much remains to be understood. A recent suite of models based upon ‘cooperative assortativity’ suggest that non-kin cooperation can evolve if individuals preferentially assort with certain cooperative phenotypes, such as helping those who help others. Here, we test these assortative hypotheses among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using an experimental resource allocation game in which individuals divide resources between themselves and camp-mates. Individuals preferentially shared with less cooperative individuals, arguing against cooperative assortativity as a mechanism sustaining resource transfers in this population. Rather, sharing was often based on the recipient's level of need, in addition to kin-based transfers and reciprocal sharing. Contrary to several recent theoretical accounts, in this real-world setting we find no evidence for cooperative assortativity influencing patterns of cooperation. These results may reflect the demands of living in a foraging ecology characterized by high resource stochasticity, necessitating need-based sharing as a system of long-term reciprocity to mitigate repeated subsistence shortfalls.

KW - Cooperation

KW - Assortativity

KW - Need-based sharing

KW - Reciprocity

KW - Hunter-gatherers

KW - Experimental games

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052149871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.08.004

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 82

EP - 89

JO - Evolution and Human Behavior

JF - Evolution and Human Behavior

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