A model incorporating potential skewed X-inactivation in MZ girls suggests that X-linked QTLs exist for several social behaviours including autism spectrum disorder

C S Loat, C M A Haworth, R Plomin, I W Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex differences in the frequency and patterns of behaviours are frequently observed and largely unexplained. We have investigated the possible role of X-linked genes in the aetiology of social behaviour problems, including those involved in autistic spectrum disorders. A novel approach has been implemented. This is based on predictions following from stochastic patterns of X-inactivation of lower concordance of monozygous female (MZF) twins than MZM twins for behaviours underpinned by X-linked QTLs and the converse that DZF twins are expected to correlate more strongly for X-linked traits than DZM twins because unlike males, females always have at least one X chromosome in common. These expectations were tested in an ongoing longitudinal cohort study in which all twins born in England and Wales between 1994 and 1996 were invited to take part. 1000 each of MZF, MZM, DZF and DZM pairs from TEDS were tested at 7 and 8 years of age. The results suggest the persistent influence of X-linked genes on cognition and social behaviour problems, including those involved in autistic spectrum disorders, from early to middle childhood. This emphasises the potential importance of X-linked genes in the developmental trajectories of behaviour and mental health and the need to stratify genetic analysis of behaviours by gender.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)742-51
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Human Genetics
Volume72
Issue numberPt 6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Keywords

  • Autistic Disorder
  • Child
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Quantitative Trait Loci
  • Sex Characteristics
  • Twins, Dizygotic
  • Twins, Monozygotic
  • X Chromosome Inactivation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A model incorporating potential skewed X-inactivation in MZ girls suggests that X-linked QTLs exist for several social behaviours including autism spectrum disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this