A native promoter and inclusion of an intron is necessary for efficient expression of GFP or mRFP in Armillaria mellea

Kathryn L Ford, K Baumgartner, Béatrice Henricot, Andy M Bailey, Gary D Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)
387 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Armillaria mellea is a significant pathogen that causes Armillaria root disease on numerous hosts in forests, gardens and agricultural environments worldwide. Using a yeast-adapted pCAMBIA0380 Agrobacterium vector, we have constructed a series of vectors for transformation of A. mellea, assembled using yeast-based recombination methods. These have been designed to allow easy exchange of promoters and inclusion of introns. The vectors were first tested by transformation into basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus to ascertain vector functionality then used to transform A. mellea. We show that heterologous promoters from the basidiomycetes Agaricus bisporus and Phanerochaete chrysosporium that were used successfully to control the hygromycin resistance cassette were not able to support expression of mRFP or GFP in A. mellea. The endogenous A. mellea gpd promoter delivered efficient expression, and we show that inclusion of an intron was also required for transgene expression. GFP and mRFP expression was stable in mycelia and fluorescence was visible in transgenic fruiting bodies and GFP was detectable in planta. Use of these vectors has been successful in giving expression of the fluorescent proteins GFP and mRFP in A. mellea, providing an additional molecular tool for this pathogen.
Original languageEnglish
Article number29226
Number of pages24
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Honey fungus
  • Agrobacterium
  • Basidiomycete
  • Fluorescent protein
  • Transformation
  • Clitopilus passeckerianus

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