'A Place for Everyone, and Everyone Must Find the Right Place': Recruitment to British Civil Defence, 1937-44

Jessica Hammett, Henry Irving

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

This chapter analyses the recruitment techniques employed by Britain’s civil defence services before and during the Second World War. Recruitment depended upon a combination of national and local efforts, with formal publicity campaigns complemented by more informal methods such as pressure from family and friends. Using a diverse range of sources – recruiting materials, local and national government records, newspaper reports, civil defence magazines, and personal testimony – the chapter analyses the development of recruitment strategies while also exploring some of the motivations for enlistment described by volunteers. It argues that while national and local publicity was crucial for developing an understanding of civil defence roles and duties, it was often personal persuasion or international events that pushed individuals to volunteer.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPropaganda and Public Relations in Military Recruitment: Promoting Military Service in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
EditorsBrendan Maartens, Thomas Bivins
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter7
ISBN (Print)9780367333928
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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  • Cite this

    Hammett, J., & Irving, H. (2020). 'A Place for Everyone, and Everyone Must Find the Right Place': Recruitment to British Civil Defence, 1937-44. In B. Maartens, & T. Bivins (Eds.), Propaganda and Public Relations in Military Recruitment: Promoting Military Service in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Routledge.