A potentially diverse fauna of springtail-hunting scydmaenines during the late Mesozoic (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae)

Ziwei Yin, Chenyang Cai*, Di Ying Huang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extinct ant-like stone beetle genus Cascomastigus Yin & Cai was recently established to accommodate C. monstrabilis Yin & Cai from the mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. This species developed a highly specialized antennal 'setal trap’, and was hypothesized to enroll these into predation on fast-moving preys, particularly springtails. However, only a single species of Cascomastigus has been known so far, and the paleodiversity of this peculiar group remains underexplored. Here we described another species, Cascomastigus minor Yin, Cai and Huang sp. nov., also from Burmese amber. The new species is distinctly smaller than C. monstrabilis, and may be further separated by the relatively longer antennomeres III, and much stouter maxillary palpomeres IV. Our new find highlights the paleodiversity of the genus Cascomastigus during the late Mesozoic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-167
Number of pages5
JournalCretaceous Research
Volume90
Early online date27 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Burmite
  • Collembola
  • Mastigini
  • Scydmaeninae
  • Setal trap

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A potentially diverse fauna of springtail-hunting scydmaenines during the late Mesozoic (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this