A randomized controlled trial of motavizumab versus palivizumab for the prophylaxis of serious respiratory syncytial virus disease in children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease

Timothy F. Feltes*, Henry M. Sondheimer, Robert M R Tulloh, Brian S. Harris, Kathryn M. Jensen, Genevieve A. Losonsky, M. Pamela Griffin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for serious respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease. This study was designed to assess the safety and tolerability of motavizumab versus palivizumab in children with CHD and was not powered for efficacy. Patients (n = 1236) aged ≤24 mo were randomized to receive five monthly doses (15 mg/kg) of motavizumab or palivizumab during the RSV season. Adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were recorded through 30 d after the last dose. RSV hospitalizations and RSV outpatient medically attended lower respiratory tract infections (MALRI; season 2) were summarized. Approximately 93 and 50% of patients reported an AE or SAE, respectively. Skin events occurred in 19.3% of motavizumab recipients and 16.2% of palivizumab recipients. Rates of hospitalizations and RSV MALRI were similar between treatment groups [relative risk (RR): 0.75; 95% CI, 0.34-1.59 and RR: 0.49; 95% CI, 0.10-1.99, respectively; bothp > 0.05]. Motavizumab and palivizumab had similar safety profiles in children with hemodynamically significantly CHD; with the exception of skin events which were increased in motavizumab recipients. Safety and efficacy were consistent with another study comparing motavizumab with palivizumab in premature infants without CHD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

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