A rights-based proposal for managing faith-based values and expectations of migrants at end-of-life illustrated by an empirical study involving South Asians in the UK

Jo Samanta*, Ash Samanta, Omar Madhloom

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

International migration is an important issue for many high-income countries and is accompanied by opportunities as well as challenges. South Asians are the largest minority ethnic group in the United Kingdom, and this diaspora is reflective of the growing diversity of British society. An empirical study was performed to ascertain the faith-based values, beliefs, views and attitudes of participants in relation to their perception of issues pertaining to end-of-life care. Empirical observations from this study, as well as the extant knowledge-base from the literature, are used to support and contextualise our reflections against a socio-legal backdrop. We argue for accommodation of faith-based values of migrants at end-of-life within normative structures of receiving countries. We posit the ethically relevant principles of inclusiveness, integration and embedment, for an innovative bioethical framework as a vehicle for accommodating faith-based values and needs of migrants at end-of-life. These tenets work conjunctively, as well as individually, in respect of individual care, enabling processes and procedures, and ultimately for formulating policy and strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)368-377
Number of pages10
JournalBioethics
Volume32
Issue number6
Early online date8 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Bibliographical note

Special Issue: Migration, health & ethics: Integrating discourses on the ethics of healthcare for migrants

Keywords

  • End-of-life care
  • Faith-based values
  • Kantian ethics
  • Rawls
  • Rights

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