A specific cognitive deficit within semantic cognition across a multi-generational family

Josie Briscoe, Rebecca Chilvers, Torsten Baldeweg, David Skuse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a study of eight members of a single family (aged 8-72 years), who all show a specific deficit in linking semantic knowledge to language. All affected members of the family had high levels of overall intelligence; however, they had profound difficulties in prose and sentence recall, listening comprehension and naming. The behavioural deficit was remarkably consistent across affected family members. Structural neuroimaging data revealed grey matter abnormalities in the left infero-temporal cortex and fusiform gyri: brain areas that have been associated with integrative semantics. This family demonstrates, to our knowledge, the first example of a heritable, highly specific abnormality affecting the interface between language and cognition in humans and has important implications for our understanding of the genetic basis of cognition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3652-61
Number of pages10
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume279
Early online date20 Jun 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2012

Structured keywords

  • Memory

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A specific cognitive deficit within semantic cognition across a multi-generational family'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this