A study in vitro of the abrasive effect of the tongue on enamel and dentine softened by acid erosion

T Gregg, S Mace, NX West, M Addy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The palatal aspect of upper anterior teeth appears to be one site of predilection for erosion. This raises the question of whether abrasion of softened enamel and dentine by the tongue has a role in this process. The aim of this study in vitro was to determine whether enamel and dentine specimens licked by the tongue after exposure to acid lost more tissue than when exposed to acid alone. Flat enamel and dentine specimens were prepared from human third molars and taped to expose a window of tissue. Three groups of specimens were exposed to citric acid for 10 min followed by 60 s tongue licking, ultrasonication or immersion in water. Two further groups of enamel specimens were placed in a low erosive drink for 10 min with or without licking. At the end of 5, 10 and 15 treatment cycles tissue loss was measured by profilometry. Enamel loss was significantly greater with licking and ultrasonication compared to water immersion. Dentine loss was greater with licking and ultrasonication compared to water immersion, but differences only reached significance for ultrasonication. The low erosive drink produced one third of the citric acid erosion and licking had no effect. The results suggest that the tongue could exert an abrasive effect on dental tissues softened by erosion, thereby increasing the overall loss of tooth substance.
Translated title of the contributionA study in vitro of the abrasive effect of the tongue on enamel and dentine softened by acid erosion
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557 - 560
Number of pages4
JournalCaries Research
Volume38 (6)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Karger AG

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