A survey of surgical draping practices in small-animal practice in the UK

Peter J Delisser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Veterinary practices in the United Kingdom were surveyed to compare their surgical draping practices with Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) accreditation tier and other surgery-related factors. Using descriptive statistics and logistic or ordinal regression analysis (where appropriate), the relationships between draping material and accreditation tier and other surgery-related factors were assessed. Procedures were categorised as short or long. Two hundred and sixty-nine surveys were completed. Reusable drapes were used in 66 per cent of practices. Antibiotics were administered routinely in 38 per cent of short and 93 per cent of long procedures. Practices accredited as a Veterinary Hospital (VH) were 6.3–7.2 (short and long surgeries, respectively) times more likely to use disposable drapes, when compared with non-accredited practices. Use of dedicated surgical attire, draping the whole animal/table, and routine antibiotic usage were also positively correlated with disposable drape usage. Fifty-one per cent of practices rated infection rate as most important when choosing drape material. ‘Best practice’ techniques are associated with lower importance given to infection rate, and higher importance given to financial cost, when choosing drape material. Disposable drape use correlates with RCVS accreditation and with other aspects of surgical technique. Importance ratings awarded correlate with best practice procedures. Clinical relevance ‘Best practice’ draping procedures, that are not governed by RCVS accreditation scheme, are also more frequently performed in accredited VHs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326
JournalVeterinary Record
Volume171
Issue number13
Early online date16 Aug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A survey of surgical draping practices in small-animal practice in the UK'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this