Abnormal first trimester serum interleukin 18 levels are associated with a poor outcome in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage

Rhoda Wilson, Judith Moor, Carol Jenkins, Helen Miller, James J. Walker, Marjorie A. McLean, J. Norman, I. B. McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

PROBLEM: How the maternal immune system adapts to tolerate the fetus is not fully understood, but a successful pregnancy is associated with the production of Th2-type cytokines and miscarriage is associated with the production of Th1-type cytokines.METHOD OF STUDY: Levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12 and IL-18 were measured in serum from 205 pregnant women of whom 115 pregnant women had a history of recurrent miscarriage.RESULTS: Compared with healthy pregnant women those who miscarried had increased serum levels of the Th1-associated cytokines IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-18.CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of IL-18 appeared to be critical in early pregnancy and were able to discriminate between pregnancies that continued and those that end in miscarriage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-159
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume51
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Keywords

  • Abortion, Habitual Cytokines Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Female Humans Interleukin-18 Pregnancy Pregnancy Outcome Pregnancy Trimester, First Prognosis Th1 Cells Th2 Cells

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