Abuse in childhood and cardiometabolic health in early adulthood: evidence from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

Ana Luiza Goncalves Soares, Annie Zimmerman, Stanley Zammit, Anke Karl, Sarah L Halligan, Abi Fraser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Background: Although childhood abuse has been consistently associated with cardiovascular disease in later adulthood, its associations with cardiometabolic health in younger adults are poorly understood. We assessed associations between childhood physical, sexual, and psychological abuse and cardiometabolic outcomes at 18 and 25 years. Methods and Results: We used data on 3,223 participants of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Exposure to childhood abuse was self-reported retrospectively at 22 years. We used linear regression to assess the associations between childhood abuse and cardiometabolic outcomes at 18 and 25 years. At 18 years, physical (β 1.35kg/m2, 95%CI 0.66, 2.05), sexual (β 0.57kg/m2, 95%CI 0.04, 1.11) and psychological (β 0.47kg/m2, 95%CI 0.01, 0.92) abuse were associated with higher BMI. Physical abuse was also associated with lower HDL (β -0.07mmol/L, 95%CI -0.13, -0.01) and higher CRP (31%, 95%CI 1%, 69%), and sexual abuse was associated with higher heart rate (β 1.92bpm, 95%CI 0.26, 3.58). At age 25 all three types of abuse were additionally associated with higher insulin, and sexual abuse was associated with lower cholesterol (-0.14mmol/L, 95%CI -0.26, -0.01). The age at which abuse occurred (<11y/11-17y) had little influence on the associations, and when sex differences were evident, associations were stronger in males. Conclusions: Childhood abuse is associated with negative cardiometabolic outcomes even by young adulthood. Further follow-up will determine whether associations strengthen across the life course and whether sex differences persist, which is essential for targeting effective screening programs and early interventions in those who suffered abuse in childhood.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 19 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Cardiometabolic health
  • Childhood abuse
  • ALSPAC

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Abuse in childhood and cardiometabolic health in early adulthood: evidence from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this