Acceptability of dietary and physical activity lifestyle modification for men following radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy for localised prostate cancer: a qualitative investigation

Lucy E Hackshaw-McGeagh*, Eileen Sutton, Raj Persad, Jonathan Aning, Amit Bahl, Anthony Koupparis, Chris Millett, Richard M Martin, J Athene Lane

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
385 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The experience and acceptability of lifestyle interventions for men with localised prostate cancer are not well understood, yet lifestyle interventions are increasingly promoted for cancer survivors. We explored the opinions, experiences and perceived acceptability of taking part in nutritional and physical activity interventions amongst men with prostate cancer and their partners; with the ultimate plan to use such information to inform the development of nutritional and physical activity interventions for men with prostate cancer.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with 16 men, and seven partners, undergoing curative surgery or radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Interviews explored experiences of lifestyle interventions, acceptable changes participants would make and perceived barriers and facilitators to change. Interviews were thematically analysed using the framework approach.

RESULTS: Men were frequently open to lifestyle modification and family support was considered vital to facilitate change. Health beneficial, clinician endorsed, understandable, enjoyable interventions were perceived as attractive. Barriers included 'modern' digital technology, poor weather, competing commitments or physical limitations, most notably incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Men were keen to participate in research, with few negative aspects identified.

CONCLUSIONS: Men are willing to change behaviour but this needs to be supported by clinicians and health professionals facilitating lifestyle change. An 'intention-behaviour gap', when an intended behaviour does not materialise, may exist. Digital technology for data collection and lifestyle measurement may not be suitable for all, and post-surgery urinary incontinence is a barrier to physical activity. These novel findings should be incorporated into lifestyle intervention development, and implemented clinically.

Original languageEnglish
Article number94
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Urology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2017

Structured keywords

  • BTC (Bristol Trials Centre)
  • Centre for Surgical Research

Keywords

  • Clinical implications
  • Intervention
  • Interview
  • Lifestyle
  • Nutrition
  • Physical activity
  • Prostate cancer
  • Qualitative
  • Radical prostatectomy
  • Radiotherapy

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