Acutely induced anxiety increases negative interpretations of events in a closed-circuit television monitoring task

Robbie Cooper, Christina J Howard, Angela S Attwood, Rachel Stirland, Viviane Rostant, Lynne Renton, Christine Goodwin, Marcus R Munafò

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two experiments we measured the effects of 7.5% CO(2) inhalation on the interpretation of video footage recorded on closed circuit television (CCTV). As predicted, inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) was associated with increases in physiological and subjective correlates of anxiety compared with inhalation of medical air (placebo). Importantly, when in the 7.5% CO(2) condition, participants reported the increased presence of suspicious activity compared with placebo (Experiment 1), a finding that was replicated and extended (Experiment 2) with no concomitant increase in the reporting of the presence of positive activity. These findings support previous work on interpretative bias in anxiety but are novel in terms of how the anxiety was elicited, the nature of the interpretative bias, and the ecological validity of the task.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCognition & emotion
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Structured keywords

  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Tobacco and Alcohol

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