Addressing concerns about smoking cessation and mental health: theoretical review and practical guide for healthcare professionals

Gemma M J Taylor, Amanda L Baker, Nadine Fox, David S Kessler, Paul Aveyard, Marcus R Munafò

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)
252 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Smoking rates in people with depression and anxiety are twice as high as in the general population, even though people with depression and anxiety are motivated to stop smoking. Most healthcare professionals are aware that stopping smoking is one of the greatest changes that people can make to improve their health. However, smoking cessation can be a difficult topic to raise. Evidence suggests that smoking may cause some mental health problems, and that the tobacco withdrawal cycle partly contributes to worse mental health. By stopping smoking, a person's mental health may improve, and the size of this improvement might be equal to taking anti-depressants. In this theoretical review and practical guide we outline ways in which healthcare professionals can raise the topic of smoking compassionately and respectfully to encourage smoking cessation. We draw on evidence-based methods like cognitive behavioural therapy, and outline approaches that healthcare professionals can use to integrate these methods into routine care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalBJPsych Advances
Volume27
Issue number2
Early online date10 Sept 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Sept 2020

Keywords

  • smoking cessation
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • low mood
  • stress
  • cognitive-behavioural therapy
  • theoretical review
  • practical guide

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