Adolescent environmental tobacco smoke exposure, not prenatal exposure to tobacco, predicts adolescent academic achievement failure

BN Collins, EP Wileyto, MFG Murphy, MR Munafo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Research has linked prenatal tobacco exposure to neurocognitive and behavioral problems that can disrupt learning and school performance in childhood. Less is known about its effects on academic achievement in adolescence when controlling for known confounding factors (e.g., environmental tobacco smoke [ETS]). We hypothesized that prenatal tobacco exposure would decrease the likelihood of passing academic achievement tests taken at 16 and 18 years of age. Methods: This study was a longitudinal analysis of birth cohort data including 6,380 pregnant women and offspring from the 1958 National Child Development Study (NCDS). Academic pass/fail performance was measured on British standardized achievement tests ("Ordinary Level" [O-Level] and Advanced Level: [A-Level]). Prenatal tobacco exposure plus controlling variables (ETS, teen offspring smoking and gender, maternal age at pregnancy, matemal smoking before pregnancy, and socioeconomic status) were included in regression models predicting O- and A-Level test failure. Results: Significant predictors of test failure in the O-Level model included exposure to matemal (OR = 0.71,p
Translated title of the contributionAdolescent environmental tobacco smoke exposure, not prenatal exposure to tobacco, predicts adolescent academic achievement failure
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363 - 370
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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