Aid and complicity: the case of war-displaced Southerners in the Northern Sudan

MR Duffield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper is concerned with the unintended consequences of aid as a relation of governance: in this case, the failure of aid agencies to improve the lot of displaced Southerners living in North Sudan after more than a decade of engagement. It is argued that aid, as a governance relation, is complicit with wider forms of oppression to which Southerners are subject. The aid-based IDP (Internally Displaced Person) identity, for example, resonates with state forms of deculturation. At the same time, developmental ideas of self-sufficiency articulate with the commercial need for cheap agricultural labour. Developmental strategies have tended to reinforce the subordination of displaced Southerners rather than enhancing their autonomy. Examples of this collateral effect are examined in relation to share-cropping, food aid, debt and asset stripping. The paper ends by calling into question the appropriateness of aid as a vehicle for a shared duty of care.
Translated title of the contributionAid and complicity: the case of war-displaced Southerners in the Northern Sudan
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83 - 104
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Modern African Studies
Volume40 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2002

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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