An adaptive polynomial based forward prediction algorithm for multi-actuator real-time dynamic substructuring

MI Wallace, DJ Wagg, SA Neild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Real-time dynamic substructuring is a novel experimental technique used to test the dynamic behaviour of complex structures. The technique involves creating a hybrid model of the entire structure by combining an experimental test piece - the substructure - with a set of numerical models. In this paper we describe a multi-actuator substructured system of a coupled three mass-spring-damper system and use this to demonstrate the nature of delay errors which can first lead to a loss of accuracy and then to instability of the substructuring algorithm. Synchronization theory and delay compensation are used to show how the delay errors, present in the transfer systems, can be minimized by online forward prediction. This new algorithm uses a more generic approach than the single step algorithms applied to substructuring thus far, giving considerable advantages in terms of flexibility and accuracy. The basic algorithm is then extended by closing the control loop resulting in an error driven adaptive feedback controller which can operate with no prior knowledge of the plant dynamics. The adaptive algorithm is then used to perform a real substructuring test using experimentally measured forces to deliver a stable substructuring algorithm.
Translated title of the contributionAn adaptive polynomial based forward prediction algorithm for multi-actuator real-time dynamic substructuring
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3807 - 2826
Number of pages20
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume461 (2064)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

Bibliographical note

Publisher: The Royal Society

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