An exploratory study of instructional practice in three Nigerian secondary schools, given student-centred recommendations in curriculum reform

Abi'odun Oyewole

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Abstract

Recent reforms of secondary education in Nigeria advocate for student-centred approaches in instructional practice (IP) (Awofala & Sopekan, 2013). Student-centred instruction (SCI) is defined as an approach, which reflects a shift from teacher-centred pedagogy, in which the learner becomes the centre of the learning process and creative methods are employed (Collins & O'Brien, 2011; Vavrus, Thomas, & Bartlett, 2011). However, increasing evidence of problematic implementation within developing countries reflects the need to be critical of SCI/learner-centred policy transfer (Schweisfurth, 2011). This study addresses an exposed lack of detailed research around education reforms in Nigeria by exploring the changes in IP since its implementation and stakeholders’ dispositions towards IP. Qualitative data collection and analysis generated two themes: teachers’ positioning as the expert and activity leader, and positive views of existing IP. These findings suggest that teacher and students’ preferences have more influence on IP than the availability of resources.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2016 STORIES Conference
Subtitle of host publicationi2i – inquiry to impact
EditorsStefania Gargioni, Anna-Maria Ramezanzadeh, Ashmita Randhawa, Henriette Arndt
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherOxford University Research Archive
Pages62-69
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780995534803
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings of the STORIES Conference
PublisherOxford: STORIES Conference
Volume2016

Keywords

  • Curriculum reform
  • Nigeria
  • student-centred instruction
  • learner-centred education in developing countries

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