An investigation of mechanical nociceptive thresholds in dogs with hind limb joint pain compared to healthy control dogs

L. K. Harris*, H. R. Whay, J. C. Murrell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
332 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of osteoarthritis (OA) on somatosensory processing in dogs using mechanical threshold testing. A pressure algometer was used to measure mechanical thresholds in 27 dogs with presumed hind limb osteoarthritis and 28 healthy dogs. Mechanical thresholds were measured at the stifles, radii and sternum, and were correlated with scores from an owner questionnaire and a clinical checklist, a scoring system that quantified clinical signs of osteoarthritis. The effects of age and bodyweight on mechanical thresholds were also investigated. Multiple regression models indicated that, when bodyweight was taken into account, dogs with presumed osteoarthritis had lower mechanical thresholds at the stifles than control dogs, but not at other sites. Non-parametric correlations showed that clinical checklist scores and questionnaire scores were negatively correlated with mechanical thresholds at the stifles. The results suggest that mechanical threshold testing using a pressure algometer can detect primary, and possibly secondary, hyperalgesia in dogs with presumed osteoarthritis. This suggests that the mechanical threshold testing protocol used in this study might facilitate assessment of somatosensory changes associated with disease progression or response to treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-90
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume234
Early online date15 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Mechanical thresholds
  • Nociception
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Pain

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