Analgesia in conjunction with normalisation of thermal sensation following deep brain stimulation for central post-stroke pain

AE Pickering, SR Thornton, SJ Love-Jones, C Steeds, N Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aetiology of central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is poorly understood and such pains are often refractory to treatment. We report the case of a 56-year-old man, who, following a temporo-parietal infarct, suffered from debilitating and refractory hemi-body cold dysaesthesia and severe tactile allodynia. This was associated with thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and hypoalgesia on his affected side. Implantation of a deep brain stimulating electrode in his periventricular gray (PVG) region produced an improvement in his pain that was associated with a striking normalisation of his deficits in somatosensory perception. This improvement in pain and thermal sensibility was reversed as stimulation became less effective, because of increased electrode impedance. Therefore, we postulate that the analgesic benefit may have occurred as a consequence of the normalisation of somatosensory function and we discuss these findings in relation to the theories of central pain generation and the potential to engage useful plasticity in central circuits.
Translated title of the contributionAnalgesia in conjunction with normalisation of thermal sensation following deep brain stimulation for central post-stroke pain
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299 - 304
Number of pages5
JournalPAIN
Volume147
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Analgesia in conjunction with normalisation of thermal sensation following deep brain stimulation for central post-stroke pain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this