Analysis of Fascin-1 in Relation to Gleason Risk Classification and Nuclear ETS-Related Gene Status of Human Prostate Carcinomas: An Immunohistochemical Study of Clinically Annotated Tumours From the Wales Cancer Bank

Matthew T Jefferies, Christopher S Pope, Howard G Kynaston, Alan R Clarke, Richard Martin, Jo Adams

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Abstract

Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing can identify early-stage prostate cancers, additional biomarkers are needed for risk-stratification. In one study, high levels of the actin-bundling protein, fascin-1, were correlated with lethal-phase, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Analyses of independent samples are needed to establish the value of fascin-1 as a possible biomarker. We examined fascin-1 by immunohistochemistry in tumour specimens from the Wales Cancer Bank in comparison to nuclear-located ERG, an emerging marker for aggressive prostate cancer. Fascin-1 was elevated in focal areas of a minority of tumours yet fascin-1-positivity did not differentiate tumours of low, intermediate, or high risk Gleason scores, and did not correlate with PSA status or biochemical relapse after surgery. Stromal fascin-1 correlated with high Gleason score. Nuclear ERG was up-regulated in tumours but not in stroma. The complexities of fascin-1 status indicate that fascin-1 is unlikely to provide a suitable biomarker for prediction of aggressive prostate cancers.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1179299X17710944
Number of pages8
JournalBiomarkers in Cancer
Volume9
Early online date30 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Structured keywords

  • ICEP

Keywords

  • Fascin
  • ERG
  • prostate cancer
  • tumour progression
  • PSA
  • Gleason

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