Anatomy of Natural Hazard Analysis: Uncertainty Propagation and Visualization

K. Goda, T. Wagener, W. P. Aspinall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

Abstract

Natural hazard analysis involves various kinds of assumptions and approximations. Observations and data used in calibration processes are subject to errors. Consequently, probabilistic hazard assessments are uncertain. The methodologies for natural hazard analyses have evolved rapidly by improving the quantification and visualization of uncertainties associated with probabilistic hazard estimates. However, approaches across different natural hazards are not uniform. Aiming at developing a cross-hazard framework for natural disaster assessment, the current methods for seismic and tsunami hazard analyses are reviewed. In light of current needs for a dynamic and integrated framework for cascading hazards, a multi-hazard approach for earthquake and tsunami is presented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk
Subtitle of host publicationQuantification, Mitigation, and Management - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2014 and the 6th International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2014
PublisherASCE
Pages1105-1115
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780784413609
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event2nd International Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2014 and the 6th International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2014 - Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Jul 201416 Jul 2014

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2014 and the 6th International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period13/07/1416/07/14

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