Anthropology in health research: from qualitative methods to multidisciplinarity

H Lambert, C McKevitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

As a response to concerns about the standard of qualitative research, attention has focused on the methods used. However, this may constrain the direction and content of qualitative studies and legitimise substandard research. Helen Lambert and Christopher McKevitt explain why anthropology may be able to contribute useful insights to health research Qualitative methods are now common in research into the social and cultural dimensions of ill health and health care. These methods derive from several social sciences, but the concepts and knowledge from some disciplinary traditions are underused. Here we describe the potential contribution of anthropology, which is based on the empirical comparison of particular societies. Anthropology has biological, social, and cultural branches, but when applied to health issues it most commonly relates to the social and cultural dimensions of health, ill health, and medicine.1
Translated title of the contributionAnthropology in health research: from qualitative methods to multidisciplinarity
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210 - 213
Number of pages4
JournalBMJ
Volume325(7378)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2002

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