Are museum 3D models still useful in planning neurosurgical approaches?

Nadia Kathrada, Giulio Anichini, Lucy Hyde, Simon Parson, A Hussain, Pragnesh Bhatt

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther Conference Contributionpeer-review

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the use of anatomical models when planning the surgical approach for a patient with a trigeminal schwannoma having middle and posterior cranial fossae involvement.
As the anatomy of the skull base is very complex, the surgical approach required careful planning. An enlarged, 3D model of the ear displaying the relevant anatomy of the surrounding middle and posterior cranial fossae was used to plan the surgical approach for excision of this trigeminal schwannoma. The plaster model made in Germany in the 19th century, resides in the anatomical museum of the University of Aberdeen.
The model was studied in detail by the surgical team as it reproduced the anatomy of the temporal bone and surrounding neurovascular structures. All possible approaches were considered with the help of detailed, dissected anatomy providing excellent visualisation of the spatial relationship of the structures encountered during different skull base approaches.
The model was useful for the planning of the neurosurgical approach directed to the posterior cranial fossa. The spatial relationships of the anatomical structures involved were thoroughly revised and this was found to be useful in planning a proper surgical strategy. This model in particular contained a wide number of removable parts, mimicking cadaveric dissection, which was particularly helpful when considering all of the surgical options available.
3D anatomical models of the skull base are an excellent addition to or substitute for cadaveric dissection, for both anatomical learning and surgical planning. Despite advances in technology, the surgical team on this occasion found this model more useful in surgical planning. This serves as a reminder that sometimes ‘old’ models can still provide a valuable source of learning and that there is still room for an anatomy museum not only in medical school but even in surgical training.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019
EventTHE 19TH CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF ASSOCIATIONS OF ANATOMIST - London
Duration: 9 Aug 201912 Aug 2019

Conference

ConferenceTHE 19TH CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF ASSOCIATIONS OF ANATOMIST
CityLondon
Period9/08/1912/08/19

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