Artificial light and biting flies: The parallel development of attractive light traps and unattractive domestic lights

Roksana Wilson*, Andrew Wakefield, Nicholas Roberts, Gareth Jones

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article (Academic Journal)peer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)
82 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Light trapping is an important tool for monitoring insect populations. This is especially true for biting Diptera, where light traps play a crucial role in disease surveillance by tracking the presence and abundance of vector species. Physiological and behavioural data have been instrumental in identifying factors that influence dipteran phototaxis and have spurred the development of more effective light traps. However, the development of less attractive domestic lights has received comparatively little interest but could be important for reducing interactions between humans and vector insects, with consequences for reducing disease transmission. Here, we discuss how dipteran eyes respond to light and the factors influencing positive phototaxis, and conclude by identifying key areas for further research. In addition, we include a synthesis of attractive and unattractive wavelengths for a number of vector species. A more comprehensive understanding of how Diptera perceive and respond to light would allow for more efficient vector sampling as well as potentially limiting the risk posed by domestic lighting.[Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Original languageEnglish
Article number28
Number of pages11
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
RW was supported by a NERC iCASE PhD studentship partnered with Integral LED, UK (Grant NE/R008701/1). Funders did not contribute to the conception, writing or editing of the manuscript or the decision to publish.

Funding Information:
RW was supported by a NERC iCASE PhD studentship partnered with the LED manufacturer Integral LED, UK. Funders did not contribute to the conception, writing, or editing of the manuscript or the decision to publish.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Diptera
  • Light attraction
  • Phototaxis
  • Spectral wavelength preferences
  • Vector

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