Association of prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease with postnatal brain development and the risk of brain injury

Shabnam Peyvandi*, Veronica De Santiago, Elavazhagan Chakkarapani, Vann Chau, Andrew Campbell, Kenneth J. Poskitt, Duan Xu, A. James Barkovich, Steven Miller, Patrick McQuillen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

IMPORTANCE The relationship of prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease (CHD) with brain injury and brain development is unknown. Given limited improvement of CHD outcomes with prenatal diagnosis, the effect of prenatal diagnosis on brain health may reveal additional benefits. OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of preoperative and postoperative brain injury and the trajectory of brain development in neonates with prenatal vs postnatal diagnosis of CHD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cohort study of term newborns with critical CHD recruited consecutively from 2001 to 2013 at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of British Columbia. Term newborns with critical CHD were studied with brain magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively and postoperatively to determine brain injury severity and microstructural brain development with diffusion tensor imaging by measuring fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient. Comparisons of magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical variables were made between prenatal and postnatal diagnosis of critical CHD. A total of 153 patients with transposition of the great arteries and single ventricle physiology were included in this analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The presence of brain injury on the preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging and the trajectory of postnatal brain microstructural development. RESULTS Among 153 patients (67%male), 96 had transposition of the great arteries and 57 had single ventricle physiology. The presence of brain injury was significantly higher in patients with postnatal diagnosis of critical CHD (41 of 86 [48%]) than in those with prenatal diagnosis (16 of 67 [24%]) (P = .003). Patients with prenatal diagnosis demonstrated faster brain development in white matter fractional anisotropy (rate of increase, 2.2%; 95%CI, 0.1%-4.2%; P = .04) and gray matter apparent diffusion coefficient (rate of decrease, 0.6%; 95%CI, 0.1%-1.2%; P = .02). Patients with prenatal diagnosis had lower birth weight (mean, 3184.5 g; 95%CI, 3050.3-3318.6) than those with postnatal diagnosis (mean, 3397.6 g; 95%CI, 3277.6-3517.6) (P = .02). Those with prenatal diagnosis had an earlier estimated gestational age at delivery (mean, 38.6 weeks; 95%CI, 38.2-38.9) than those with postnatal diagnosis (mean, 39.1 weeks; 95%CI, 38.8-39.5) (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Newborns with prenatal diagnosis of single ventricle physiology and transposition of the great arteries demonstrate less preoperative brain injury and more robust microstructural brain development than those with postnatal diagnosis. These results are likely secondary to improved cardiovascular stability. The impact of these findings on neurodevelopmental outcomes warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere154450
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA Pediatrics
Volume170
Issue number4
Early online date22 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Apr 2016

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