Associations between trematode infections in cattle and freshwater snails in highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, Tanzania

Jahashi Nzalawahe, Ayub A Kassuku, J Russell Stothard, Gerald C Coles, Mark C Eisler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

7 Citations (Scopus)
350 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The epidemiology of trematode infections in cattle was investigated within highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, in southern Tanzania. Fecal samples were collected from 450 cattle in 15 villages at altitudes ranging from 696 to 1800 m above the sea level. Freshwater snails were collected from selected water bodies and screened for emergence of cercariae. The infection rates in cattle were Fasciola gigantica 28·2%, paramphistomes 62·8% and Schistosoma bovis 4·8%. Notably, prevalence of trematode infections in cattle was much higher in highland (altitude > 1500 m) as compared with lowland (altitude < 1500 m) areas and was statistically significant (P-value = 0·000) for F. gigantica and paramphistomes but not for S. bovis. The snails collected included Lymnaea natalensis, Bulinus africanus, Bulinus tropicus, Bulinus forskali, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Melanoides tuberculata and Bellamya constricta with a greater proportion of highland (75%) than lowland (36%) water bodies harbouring snails. Altitude is a major factor shaping the epidemiology of F. gigantica and paramphistomes infections in cattle in Iringa Rural District with greater emphasis upon control needed in highland areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalParasitology
Volume142
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • Fasciola gigantica
  • paramphistome
  • Schistoma bovis
  • altitude
  • Tanzania
  • Cattle
  • Sub-Saharan Africa

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