Associations of vitamin D pathway genes with circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D, and prostate cancer: a nested case–control study

Rebecca Gilbert*, Carolina Bonilla, Chris Metcalfe, Sarah Lewis, David M. Evans, William D. Fraser, John P. Kemp, Jenny L. Donovan, Freddie C. Hamdy, David E. Neal, J. Athene Lane, George Davey Smith, Mark Lathrop, Richard M. Martin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)
349 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Vitamin D pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are potentially useful proxies for investigating whether circulating vitamin D metabolites [total 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, 25(OH)D; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin, 1,25(OH)2D] are causally related to prostate cancer. We investigated associations of sixteen SNPs across seven genes with prostate-specific antigen-detected prostate cancer.

METHODS: In a nested case-control study (within the ProtecT trial), we estimated odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) quantifying associations between SNPs and prostate cancer. Subgroup analyses investigated whether associations were stronger in men who had high/low sun exposure [a proxy for 25(OH)D]. We quantified associations of SNPs with stage (T1-T2/T3-T4) and grade (<7/≥7). Multiple variant scores included SNPs encoding proteins involved in 25(OH)D synthesis and metabolism.

RESULTS: We included 1,275 prostate cancer cases (141 locally advanced, 385 high grades) and 2,062 healthy controls. Vitamin D-binding protein SNPs were associated with prostate cancer (rs4588-A: OR 1.20, CI 1.01, 1.41, p = 0.04; rs7041-T: OR 1.19, CI 1.02, 1.38, p = 0.03). Low 25(OH)D metabolism score was associated with high (vs low) grade (OR 0.76, CI 0.63, 0.93, p = 0.01); there was a similar association of its component variants: rs6013897-A in CYP24A1 (OR 0.78, CI 0.60, 1.01, p = 0.06) and rs10877012-T in CYP27B1 (OR 0.80, CI 0.63, 1.02, p = 0.07). There was no evidence that associations differed by level of sun exposure.

CONCLUSION: We found some evidence that vitamin D pathway SNPs were associated with prostate cancer risk and grade, but not stage. There was no evidence of an association in men with deficient vitamin D (measured by having low sun exposure).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-218
Number of pages14
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume26
Issue number2
Early online date9 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Surgical Research

Keywords

  • 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D
  • 25 hydroxyvitamin-D
  • Prostate cancer
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin D pathway genes

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