Australian carbon tetrachloride emissions in a global context

Paul J. Fraser*, Bronwyn L. Dunse, Alistair J. Manning, Sean Walsh, R. Hsiang J. Wang, Paul B. Krummel, L. Paul Steele, Laurie W. Porter, Colin Allison, Simon O'Doherty, Peter G. Simmonds, Jens Muehle, Ray F. Weiss, Ronald G. Prinn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global (1978-2012) and Australian (1996-2011) carbon tetrachloride emissions are estimated from atmospheric observations of CCl4 using data from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) global network, in particular from Cape Grim, Tasmania. Global and Australian emissions are in decline in response to Montreal Protocol restrictions on CCl4 production and consumption for dispersive uses in the developed and developing world. However, atmospheric data-derived emissions are significantly larger than 'bottom-up' estimates from direct and indirect CCl4 production, CCl4 transportation and use. Australian CCl4 emissions are not a result of these sources, and the identification of the origin of Australian emissions may provide a clue to the origin of some of these 'missing' global sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-88
Number of pages12
JournalEnvironmental Chemistry
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • atmospheric and 'bottom-up' emissions estimates
  • Australian carbon tetrachloride emissions
  • emission estimates by inverse calculations and interspecies correlation
  • global carbon tetrachloride emissions
  • CAPE-GRIM
  • ATMOSPHERIC HALOCARBONS
  • EUROPEAN EMISSIONS
  • MONTREAL PROTOCOL
  • FIRN AIR
  • CHLOROFORM
  • GASES
  • PRODUCTS
  • TASMANIA
  • TRENDS

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