Barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle and acceptability of a dietary and physical activity intervention among African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors in the UK: a qualitative study

Vanessa Er, J. Athene Lane, Richard Martin, Raj Persad, Frank Chinegwundoh, Victoria Njoku, Eileen Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
261 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: Diet and lifestyle may have a role in delaying prostate cancer progression, but little is known about the health behaviours of Black British prostate cancer survivors despite this group having a higher prostate cancer mortality rate than their White counterparts. We explored the barriers and facilitators to dietary and lifestyle changes and the acceptability of a diet and physical activity intervention in African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors.

Design: We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews and used thematic analysis to code and group the data.

Participants and setting: We recruited 14 African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors via letter or at oncology follow-up appointments using purposive and convenience sampling.

Results: A prostate cancer diagnosis did not trigger dietary and lifestyle changes in most men. This lack of change was underpinned by five themes: pre-cancer diet and lifestyle, evidence, coping with prostate cancer, ageing, and autonomy. Men perceived their diet and lifestyle to be healthy and were uncertain about the therapeutic benefits of these factors on prostate cancer recurrence. They considered a lifestyle intervention as unnecessary because their prostate-specific-antigen (PSA) level was kept under control by the treatments they had received. They believed dietary and lifestyle changes should be self-initiated and motivated, but were willing to make additional changes if they were perceived to be beneficial to health. Nonetheless, some men cited advice from health professionals and social support in coping with prostate cancer as facilitators to positive dietary and lifestyle changes. A prostate cancer diagnosis and ageing also heightened men’s awareness of their health, particularly in regards to their body weight.

Conclusions: A dietary and physical activity intervention framed as helping men to regain fitness and aid post-treatment recovery aimed at men with elevated PSA may be appealing and acceptable to African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere017217
Number of pages10
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number10
Early online date15 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Structured keywords

  • BTC (Bristol Trials Centre)

Keywords

  • Qualitative research
  • prostatic neoplasm
  • diet
  • physical activity
  • Caribbean region
  • survivors

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