Bicarbonate and dichloroacetate: evaluating pH altering therapies in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer

Ian F Robey, Natasha K Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The glycolytic nature of malignant tumors contributes to high levels of extracellular acidity in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor acidity is a driving force in invasion and metastases. Recently, it has been shown that buffering of extracellular acidity through systemic administration of oral bicarbonate can inhibit the spread of metastases in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. While these findings are compelling, recent assessments into the use of oral bicarbonate as a cancer intervention reveal limitations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Administration, Oral
  • Animals
  • Sodium Bicarbonate
  • Bicarbonates
  • Antineoplastic Agents
  • Humans
  • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
  • Tumor Microenvironment
  • Tumor Burden
  • Breast Neoplasms
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Mice
  • Cell Line, Tumor
  • Dichloroacetic Acid
  • Cell Hypoxia
  • Lactates
  • Lung Neoplasms
  • Mice, SCID
  • Female
  • Survival Analysis

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