BIOMASS ENERGY AND THE GLOBAL CARBON BALANCE

DO HALL*, Joanna Isobel House

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies on climate change and energy production increasingly recognise the crucial role of biological systems. Carbon sinks in forests (above and below ground), CO2 emissions from deforestation, planting trees for carbon storage, and biomass as a substitute for fossil fuels are some of the key issues which arise. Halting deforestation is of paramount importance, but there is also great potential for reforestation of degraded lands, agroforestry and improved forest management. We conclude biomass energy plantations and other types of energy cropping could be a more effective strategy for carbon mitigation than simply growing trees as a carbon store, particularly on higher productivity lands. Use of the biomass produced as an energy source has the added advantage of a wide range of other environmental, social and economic benefits. The constraints to achieving environmentally-acceptable biomass production are not insurmountable. Rather they should be seen as scientific and entrepreneurial opportunities which will yield numerous advantages in the long term.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-66
Number of pages9
JournalRenewable Energy
Volume5
Issue number1-4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1994
EventWorld Renewable Energy Congress - Climate Change, Energy and the Environment - READING, United Kingdom
Duration: 11 Sep 199416 Sep 1994

Keywords

  • FOREST STRATEGIES
  • CO2
  • LAND AVAILABILITY
  • ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
  • BIOMASS ENERGY
  • FOSSIL FUEL SUBSTITUTION
  • ATMOSPHERIC CARBON
  • TROPICAL FORESTS
  • DIOXIDE
  • OPTIONS

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