Blood transfusion rates following shoulder arthroplasty in a high volume UK centre and analysis of risk factors associated with transfusion

Peter J Dacombe, John Kendall, McCann Phillip, Iain Packham, Partha Sarangi, Michael Whitehouse, Mark Crowther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
259 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aims: To determine the blood transfusion rates following shoulder arthroplasty and to establish risk factors associated with increased risk of transfusion. Materials and Methods: All shoulder arthroplasty cases performed between January 2012 - March 2017 in a tertiary upper limb unit were identified. Patients who received peri-operative tranexamic acid were excluded. Retrospective review of case notes was completed to identify transfusion rate and risk factors. Univariate and multi-variate analysis was performed to analyse the association between risk factors and transfusion rate. Results: 537 shoulder arthroplasties performed in 474 patients were included. Peri- or post-operative transfusion was required in 21 cases (3.9%). Univariate analysis suggested significant association with age (p=0.005), female sex (0.015), pre-operative haemoglobin / haematocrit (p<0.001), peri-operative drop in haemoglobin (p<0.001) ASA grade (p<0.001) and transfusion rate. Only peri-operative drop in haemoglobin (p<0.001) and ASA grade (p=0.039) retained significance on multi-variable analysis. Conclusions: The blood transfusion rate following shoulder arthoplasty was 3.9%. Greater peri-operative drop in haemoglobin and higher ASA grade were associated with increased risk of transfusion on multivariate analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalShoulder and Elbow
Early online date14 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 May 2018

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Surgical Research

Keywords

  • Shoulder
  • Arthroplasty
  • Transfusion
  • Outcome
  • Complications

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