Can motivations for studying dentistry inform us about gender and BME differences in dental academic careers?

Andrea E Waylen, Oliver Barnes, Peter Kenyon, Patricia Neville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

5 Citations (Scopus)
290 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There are various motivators that prompt people to study dentistry but there is evidence that the salience of each varies according to gender and black and minority ethnic (BME) group. Given the current focus on inequality within the science, technology, engineering, medicine and mathematics (STEMM) academic disciplines where dentistry sits, it is important to understand the relevance of different motivators to different social groups if inequality is to be overcome. We carried out a survey of dental students from 11 out of the 18 dental schools in the UK to find out what prompted them to study dentistry. Our findings showed that most people make a personal choice to study dentistry and follow a patient-focused career while the prospect of an academic career was important for less than half of our sample. Differences according to gender and BME group were apparent but did not follow these trends. In order to continue to improve the diversity within dental academia dental schools should consider the different preferences of the workforce and work to broaden its potential.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-15
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Dental Journal
Volume222
Issue number1
Early online date13 Jan 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jan 2017

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