Capacity for the management of kidney failure in the International Society of Nephrology Western Europe region: Report from the 2023 ISN Global Kidney Health Atlas (ISN-GKHA)

Maria Pippias*, Gaetano Alfano, Dearbhla M. Kelly, Maria Jose Soler, Letizia De Chiara, Fergus J Caskey, et al

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Western Europe boasts advanced healthcare systems, robust kidney care guidelines, and a well-established healthcare workforce. Despite this, significant disparities in kidney replacement therapy incidence, prevalence, and transplant access exist. This paper presents the third International Society of Nephrology Global Kidney Health Atlas’s findings on kidney care availability, accessibility, affordability, and quality in 22 Western European countries, representing 99% of the region's population. The known chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevalence across Western Europe averages 10.6%, slightly above the global median. Cardiovascular diseases account for a substantial portion of CKD-related deaths. Kidney failure incidence varies. Government health expenditure differs, however, most countries offer government-funded acute kidney injury, dialysis, and kidney transplantation care. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are universally available, with variations in the number of dialysis centers. Kidney transplantation is available in all countries (except for three microstates), with variable transplant center prevalence. Conservative kidney management is increasingly accessible. The region's kidney care workforce is substantial, exceeding global averages, however, workforce shortages are reported. Barriers to optimal kidney care include limited workforce capacity, lack of surveillance mechanisms, and suboptimal integration into national non-communicable disease strategies. Policy recognition of CKD as a health priority varies across countries. While Western Europe exhibits strong kidney care infrastructure, opportunities for improvement exist, particularly in CKD prevention, surveillance, awareness, and policy implementation. Efforts to improve CKD care should include automated detection, educational support, and enhanced workflows. Based on these findings, healthcare professionals, stakeholders, and policymakers are called to act to enhance kidney care across the region.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-151
Number of pages16
JournalKidney International Supplements
Volume13
Issue number1
Early online date8 Apr 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright 2024, International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Capacity for the management of kidney failure in the International Society of Nephrology Western Europe region: Report from the 2023 ISN Global Kidney Health Atlas (ISN-GKHA)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this