Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity is not correlated to sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity within healthy, young humans

A P Dutiot, ECJ Hart, N Charkoudian, B G Wallin, T B Curry, M J Joyner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities within healthy, young humans. The sensitivities of the cardiac and sympathetic baroreflexes were compared in 53 normotensive individuals (28 men and 25 women; age: 24.0 ± 0.9 years; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.3 cm/kg², mean ± SEM). Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and peroneal muscle sympathetic nerve activity were recorded under resting conditions (heart rate: 58 ± 1 bpm; systolic blood pressure: 126 ± 2 mm Hg; diastolic blood pressure: 72 ± 1 mm Hg; mean arterial blood pressure: 89 ± 1 mm Hg; muscle sympathetic nerve activity: 18 ± 1 bursts per min) and during rapid changes in blood pressure induced by sequential boluses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities were analyzed using the slopes of the linear portions of the muscle sympathetic nerve activity-diastolic blood pressure and R-R interval-systolic blood pressure relationships, respectively. When individual cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was compared with sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity, no correlation (R-R interval: r = -0.13; heart rate: r = 0.21) was observed when studied as a group. Analysis by sex unveiled a correlation in women between the cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities (R-R interval: r = -0.54; P = 0.01; no correlation with hazard ratio: r = 0.29). No relationship was found in men (R-R interval: r = 0.17; heart rate: r = 0.12). These results indicate that, although both cardiac and sympathetic efferents function in baroreflex control of arterial pressure, there is no correlation in their sensitivities within healthy normotensive humans. However, sex-stratified data indicate that sex-based differential correlations might exist.
Translated title of the contributionCardiac baroreflex sensitivity is not correlated to sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity within healthy, young humans
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1118 - 1123
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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