Challenges and progress in adverse event ascertainment and reporting in clinical trials

MN Lassere, KR Johnson, TG Woodworth, DE Furst, JF Fries, Kirwan J R, PS Tugwell, RO Day, PM Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxicity, safety, and tolerability are integral facets of patient risk/benefit decisions, yet the capacity to define, measure, and compare these aspects is underdeveloped compared to aspects of efficacy. There are many reasons for this, scientific and administrative, but all are surmountable. Probably the greatest primary obstacle is the absence of a measurement instrument designed specifically for this purpose. There are increasing calls from various stakeholders for better evidence, and therefore better ascertainment, in this area, especially in randomized trials, and for these reasons OMERACT began deliberations about these concepts in 1994. A prototype coding instrument (the Rheumatology Common Toxicity Criteria) was developed and discussed at OMERACT 5. In the 2 years before OMERACT 7, a process of concept development and iterative design and testing were conducted to develop a patient self-report and investigator-reported adverse event instruments designed for use in trials at the time of visit. The predominant workload is performed by the patient in a self-report checklist, which is then mapped by the trialist onto a medically sophisticated version. This article presents background on the process of developing a dual adverse event instrument, which was presented and critically discussed in detail at OMERACT 7.
Translated title of the contributionChallenges and progress in adverse event ascertainment and reporting in clinical trials
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2030 - 2032
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume32(10)
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

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