Challenging minds? Students' perceptions of computer-based World Class Tests of problem solving

MT Richardson, J-A Baird, J Ridgway, M Ripley, D Shorrocks-Taylor, M Swan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computerised assessment -- an international peer reviewed journal article that investigated students' responses to computerised tests of problem solving and mathematics. The study reports observations and interviews of students as they completed the tests. Students found the tasks engaging and motivating, despite the unfamiliarity of the problem types, the medium of testing, and the challenging nature of the items. Students had no problems working with computers, or with an unfamiliar interface. They were sometimes distracted by attractive graphics, and sometimes used poor heuristics when dealing with realistic tasks. The study provides evidence that a computer environment can provide new ways to assess the problem solving skills of highly able students. This was an invited submission to a special edition of this journal, although it was peer reviewed in the normal manner. The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority invited a presentation on this research at a World Class Tests conference in December 2001.
Translated title of the contributionChallenging minds? Students' perceptions of computer-based World Class Tests of problem solving
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)633 - 649
Number of pages17
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume18 (6)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Elsevier

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    Richardson, MT., Baird, J-A., Ridgway, J., Ripley, M., Shorrocks-Taylor, D., & Swan, M. (2002). Challenging minds? Students' perceptions of computer-based World Class Tests of problem solving. Computers in Human Behavior, 18 (6), 633 - 649. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0747-5632(02)00021-3