Changes in reported food intake in adults with type 2 diabetes in response to a non-prescriptive dietary intervention

Clare Y England, Russell Jago, Rob C Andrews, Janice L Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: There is a lack of published data about the food intake of patients with type 2 diabetes and the changes that they make in response to patient-centred dietary advice. This study describes the changes made in response to a non-prescriptive dietary intervention based upon UK dietary guidelines.

Methods: 262 participants, 87 women and 175 men, from the Early ACTivity in Diabetes trial who received the dietary intervention returned 4 day food diaries at baseline and 6 months. Non-parametric tests were used to examine changes in meal patterns, total energy intake and energy from food groups between baseline and 6 months.

Results: Mean number of meals eaten per day was 3.0±0.3 and mean number of snacks was 1.1±0.6 at both baseline and 6 months for men and women. Men decreased energy intake by 218 ± 332kcal/day (p<0.001) and women by 123 ± 270kcal/day (p<0.001). Men reduced energy (kcal/day) from alcoholic drinks (-56±126, p<0.001), white bread (-27 ±96, p=0.001), biscuits (i.e., cookies -16±49, p<0.001) and cakes (-12± 98, p=0.0012). Women reduced energy from mixed main meals (-32±109, p=0.036), pasta and rice (-19 ±78, p= 0.019), high energy drinks (-14 ±38, p=0.001) and white bread (-14 ±88, p=0.042).

Conclusion: Men and women in the Early ACTID study made small changes in higher energy and lower fibre foods and drinks in response to patient-centred dietary advice.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Type 2 diabetes, dietary intervention, dietary change

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