Changing a discipline in universities and a subject in schools: British geography in the 1950s-1970s

Ron Johnston*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
21 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Geography emerged as an academic discipline in British universities in response to demands for trained teachers of the subject in the country’s burgeoning secondary schools and their curricula formed a seamless transition from one to the other. In the 1960s a major shift in the nature of the academic discipline – often termed the ‘quantitative and theoretical revolutions’ – created a breach between the two, but there were demands from within the university sector for changes to the school subject so that a new seamless transition could be instated. This essay charts the nature of those changes and how they were brought about by the key actors, both individual and institutional. Having created that apparent unity, subsequent changes saw the two educational sectors drift apart, although recent developments have sought to reinstate stronger links.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages18
JournalHistory of Education
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Britain
  • Geography
  • quantitative revolution
  • schools and universities

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