Characterisation of Self-locking High-contraction Electro-ribbon Actuators

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Actuators are essential devices that exert force and do work. The contraction of an actuator (how much it can shorten) is an important property that strongly influences its applications, especially in engineering and robotics. While high contractions have been achieved by thermally- or fluidically-driven technologies, electrically-driven actuators typically cannot contract by more than 50%. Recently developed electro-ribbon actuators are simple, low cost, scalable electroactive devices powered by dielectrophoretic liquid zipping (DLZ) that exhibit high efficiency (~70%), high power equivalent to mammalian muscle (~100 W/kg), contractions exceeding 99%. We characterise the electro-ribbon actuator and explore contraction variation with voltage and load. We describe the unique self-locking behaviour of the electro-ribbon actuator which could allow for low-power-consumption solenoids and valves. Finally, we show the interdependence of constituent material properties and the important role that material choice plays in maximising performance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2020
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages5856-5861
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781728173955
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2020
Event2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2020 - Paris, France
Duration: 31 May 202031 Aug 2020

Publication series

NameProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
ISSN (Print)1050-4729

Conference

Conference2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2020
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period31/05/2031/08/20

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
* Majid Taghavi is supported by EPSRC grant EP/R02961X/1. T. Helps is supported by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Office of the Chief Science Adviser for National Security under the UK Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship Programme. Jonathan Rossiter is supported by the Royal Academy of Engineering through the Chair in Emerging Technologies scheme and EPSRC grant EP/M020460/1.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 IEEE.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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