Children's use of the temporal dimension of gaze for inferring preference

Shiri Einav, BM Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined 4- and 5-year-olds' ability to spontaneously use the relative duration and frequency of another's object-directed gaze for inferring that person's preference. In Experiment 1, analysis revealed a strong age effect for judgment accuracy, which could not be accounted for by cue-monitoring proficiency. Reducing the saliency of the objects in Experiment 2 yielded significant improvement in the younger children's performance. Thus, at 4 years, children already show signs of attending to the temporal dimension of gaze for making mentalistic inferences of preferential liking, but their competence may be undermined by the object choices themselves. By 5 years, they appear to overcome this competition. The obtained developmental difference is discussed in terms of concurrent transitions in attention regulation.
Translated title of the contributionChildren's use of the temporal dimension of gaze for inferring preference
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142 - 152
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume42 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: American Psychological Association

Structured keywords

  • Developmental

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